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Edition 15.19 Greenhouse Garden Center News May, 2015

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Carson City, NV 89703

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Featured Quote:

"It was such a pleasure to sink one's hands into the warm earth, to feel at one's finger tips the possibilities of the new season" - Kate Morton, "The Forgotten Garden"


Greenhouse Carden Center Newsletter
 

SUMMER HOURS:
WEEKDAYS: 8:OO AM TO 6:00 PM
SUNDAYS: 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM


It's time to break out the summer clothes in earnest and start working on that gardeners tan. May is such an exciting month here at Greenhouse Garden Center. We are in full swing with gorgeous flowering bedding plants and yummy vegetable starts arriving every day.

We will be kicking off May starting with our expanded summer hours. Your will be able to shop every day but Sunday from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM and on Sundays from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The first weekend we kick off our Dr Earth Sale, the second weekend is our Mothers Day Rose Sale and Tomatomania begins the third weekend.

We are excited to have the Carson High School Jazz Band performing on Saturday May 16th from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM. The CHS band boosters will be selling hot dogs, soft drinks and snacks on the 16th all day. Come out and make a day of it, starting with David's annual Let's Talk Tomatoes and Peppers class starting at 9:00 AM.

We will be offering a Wednesday evening class on Composting on the 6th at 5:30 PM. We are hoping that those that have to work Saturdays might be interested in a weeknight class. All month long we will be offering Bumper Crop and Paydirt Buy 3 bags and get the 4th bag free, no limits, mix and match.

It is that time of year when we welcome Linda Marrone and the Early Farmers Market to the South parking lot on Saturdays. This year the Early Farmers Market will start on May 9th and runs from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM. This is your chance to support our local growers and get some really delicious seasonal fruits,vegetables and flowers.


may

PAYDIRT AND BUMPER CROP - BUY 3 GET 1 FREE SALE
ATTEND A SEMINAR - RECEIVE A COUPON FOR UP TO 5 ITEMS AT A SAVINGS OF 15% - SEMINARS COST $2
 
MAY 2
SUMMER HOURS BEGIN 8 AM TO 6 PM MON.-SAT., 9 AM TO 5 PM SUNDAY
 
MAY 2-10
DR. EARTH PRODUCT SALE - ANY SIZE OR TYPE
 
May 2
Seminar, “Square Foot Gardening and Using Smart Pots”, Speaker - David Ruf, 9:00AM
 
May 6
Seminar, "All About Composting", Speaker - David Ruf, 5:30 PM
 
May 9
Seminar, "Growing Roses in N. Nevada", Speaker - Elona Lathrop, 9:00 AM.
 
MAY 9
EARLY FARMERS MARKET BEGINS, SATURDAYS 9:00 AM TO 1:00 PM
 
MAY 9-10
MOTHERS DAY ROSE SALE, BUY 2 ROSES AND GET 1 FREE, 8:00 AM TO 6:00 PM
 
MAY 16-24
TOMATOMANIA BEGINS! BUY 2 TOMATOES AND GET 1 FREE
 
May 16
Seminar, “Let’s Talk Tomatoes and Peppers”, Speaker - David Ruf, 9:00AM
 
May 16
CHS Jazz Band, 11:00 AM-1:00 PM
 
May 23
Seminar, “Attracting Birds To Your Yard”, Speaker - Elona Lathrop, 9:00 AM
 
May 30
Seminar, "Designing Edible Containers", Speaker - David Ruf, 9:00 AM

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drearth

tomatomania

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roses
 

Greenhouse Garden Centers roses were planted bare-root during the spring, and until they are fully rooted out should be planted with special care so that the new roots are not damaged and your roses do not suffer transplant shock. After digging your planting hole, mix the soil you removed with about ½ as much compost or Rose Planting Mix. Back fill the hole with the compost and soil moisture so that the surface of the soil in the pot will be at the same level as the surrounding soil. Watering the soil gently will eliminate any air pockets. Water with a dilution of Master Nursery Root Master B1 to help your plant become established more quickly. Regular watering and fertilization is essential to the healthy growth of your roses. Consider using Bayer Systemic Rose & Flower or Dr Earth Rose & Flower Fertilizer to both fertilize and protect your plants from insect damage. You may need to water your roses daily if the temperatures are over 85F° and the wind is blowing”for the first week only. Roses respond well to watering every three days or less once they become established.

Pests & Diseases
Spider mites are minute reddish insects prevalent in hot, dry weather. Infected plants look yellow, dry, and dusty. Leaves become mottled on top then yellow, curl up, and fall off. Undersides of leaves may be covered in fine webs. Spray dormant oil just before leaf bud break to kill overwintering eggs. Apply a summer horticultural oil or a stronger miticide to kill adults.

Signs of sucking thrips include brown streaks and spots on petals, distorted blossoms, bud failure, and white, withered leaves. Remove infected plant parts. Apply foliar insecticide or a systemic poison.

Aphids congregate and feed on new shoots, leaves, and flower buds, deforming plant parts. Knock off adults with blasts of water from the hose or spray plants with insecticidal soap and summer horticultural oil. Dormant oil in late winter or early spring will kill the overwintering eggs.

Borers tunnel into canes and twigs, causing internal damage. Infected canes turn brown, wilt, and die back. Prune infected canes back to areas of healthy growth and burn the cuttings. Seal cuts with any of the sealers Greenhouse Garden Center sells.

Leaf-cutter bees make regular circular cuts in leaf margins as the collect nesting material. These are beneficial pollinators and should be tolerated.

Black spot, a waterborne fungus, infects leaves during warm, humid weather. Small black spots appear on the leaves, which become encircled with yellow rings. Leaves yellow and drop off, defoliating the entire plant. Leave plenty of space between plants and avoid overhead watering. Remove infected leaves and discard them. Spray with fungicide.

Powdery mildew forms a grayish white powder on leaves and may stunt growth of young canes and interfere with flower development. Give plants good ventilation. Treat with fungicide.

Pruning
Pruning should be done while plants are dormant. We recommend April 15th. First, thin the plant by removing weak, crowded, crossing or malformed branches to let light and air into the plant. Then shorten the plant by not more than two-thirds of new growth. Don't prune climbing roses, thin them by selecting 3-4 of the strongest looking canes and cut the rest off back to the graft site.  After pruning, seal freshly cut ends of canes to prevent borers. Always use sharp shears and cut at an angle a short distance above a bud. The plant will send out new growth from that bud, and the direction the bud faces will determine the direction the new branch takes. Deadhead (removal of spent flowers) throughout the season to encourage re-blooming.

Classification of Roses
Climbing: Roses with long arching canes (to 14'), suitable for training on low fences or trellises.
English: A new class of roses in which the repeat blooming habits of modern roses are combined with the form and fragrance of old garden roses.
Floribunda: Medium sized flowers mostly borne in cluster, often more compact in habit, medium length stems.
Grandiflora: Large flowers borne in clusters, usually taller in habit, individual stems within each cluster are suitable for cutting.
Groundcover Rose: A rose with a prostrate habit that can be used for bedding.
Hybrid Musk: A modern class of roses with an old-fashioned look. Their long, arching canes can be trained as shrubs or climbers
Hybrid Rugosa: Exceptionally hardy, vigorous, usually upright compact plants. Most are recurrent bloomers.
Hybrid Tea: Large flowers generally borne one per stem, medium to tall in habit, with long cutting stems.
Miniature: Small flowered roses with proportionately smaller foliage, often very compact in habit. Stems are also shorter but still suitable for cutting.
Patio Rose: A miniature tree rose of 18" to 24" in height.
Polyantha: Polyanthas present their delicate flowers in sprays well above their foliage.
Rambler: A climbing rose, that presents clusters of small blooms on long, slender canes.
Shrub: Any rose that presents its blooms close to the foliage and is well suited for unattended use in the landscape, usually good disease resistance and hardiness. Most are grown on their own root.
Once-blooming: A rose that has one annual bloom over an extended period in late spring or early summer. Most species and many old garden roses are once-blooming. Most modern roses are not.


whatsnew
 
deancrouser

ORIGINAL ART WORK BY DEAN CROUSER

The vibrant watercolor paintings of Oregon wildlife artist Dean Crouser bring exquisite beauty to tabletop stoneware, wall art and additional home accents.  Colorful butterflies and dragonflies are the newest complement to Dean's popular bird imagery.  Don't miss the brand new artful memo boards and pretty coasters decorated with his breathtaking paintings.  Seasons, Greenhouse Garden Center's premier gift shop is thrilled to feature Dean Crouser.

 

aquasmart

AQUASMART PRO - WATER LESS, GROW MORE

AquaSmart is an engineered, biodegradable, super-absorbent sand created with a patented process that allows it to retain up to 12 times its weight in water and water soluble nutrients.  This product saves up to 66% on watering and irrigation.  It enhances turf and plant growth, decreases nutrient loss, and increases germination of seed.  It is biodegradable and non-toxic.  Currently, here at Greenhouse Garden Center we are stocking it in two different sizes.

 
frangula
FINE LINE BUCKTHORN - RHAMNUS frangula

Have you been looking for a foundation or privacy screen plant that is not an upright juniper or arborvitae.  Fine Line Buckthorn may be just what you are looking for.  Even though this shrub is slow growing it will grow to 60"-84" tall with just a 2' spread.  It's narrow, columnar form is fantastic for adding texture and shape to the garden.  The fern-like foliage turns yellow in the fall.  This shrub will take full or part sun, is non-invasive, and deer resistant.  Here at Greenhouse Garden Center we have a nice selection of Fine Line Buckthorn in a variety of sizes and prices.


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maytodo
 
  1. Fertilize, Fertilize, Fertilize! Consider adding an injector system to your drip system - it's simple, easy and very cost effective. Most trees, shrubs, and flowers like a more acidic food here in Northern Nevada. If your plant material is on a drip system, apply Jobe's Organic Fertilizer Spikes at the area of the emitters, Master Nursery Multi-Purpose Fertilizer 16-16-16 is also a good alternative. For a more organic approach to fertilizing, consider DR EARTH or Garden & Bloome Fertilizer.
  2. Spraying pine trees with two different fungicides, such as Daconil and Phyton 27, will stop the spread of several deadly diseases. Begin spraying when the needle tips are elongating and continue to spray once a week for 3 to 4 weeks.
  3. Frost happens! Freezeproof enhances plants' natural antifreeze properties. This product adds protection to plants of 3 to 9 degrees up to 30 days.
  4. Spurge can be controlled now by applying pre-emergent Weedbeater Complete to the lawn. This pre and post emergent product will kill existing actively growing weeds as well as kill the weed seeds without hurting the grass.
  5. Keep after the coddling moths to prevent those wormy apples. After apple and pear trees have experienced 80% blossom drop it is time to apply Bonide Fruit Tree Spray or Captain Jacks Deadbug once a week for 3 weeks.
  6. Aphids begin appearing on the snowball bushes, birch, plum, peach, cherry trees and roses. Effective treatment includes any one of the following, or in several combinations. Imidacloprid, a systemic soil drench, available in formulations for edibles and non-edibles is a once a year application. It does take up to 4 weeks to be systemically absorbed up into the entire plant. A contact spray may need to be applied three times at 5-7 day intervals. Ladybugs or Green Lacewings are an organic way to control aphids if you don't wish to use chemicals.
  7. Continue to shade your pond. Use Microbe-lift and Barley Bales to control algae. Fertilize pond plants with Organic Fertilizer Spikes.
  8. Petunias, alyssum, and calendulas will take some frost. Marigolds, salvia, vinca, impatiens, tomatoes and peppers turn black at 32 degrees. So be cautious!
  9. Annual bedding plants, water plants and perennials arrive almost daily now.
  10. Plant corn, potatoes, asparagus and summer bulbs early this month. Dust your cabbage with Vegetable and Garden Dust. Plant all your warm season vegetable seeds around the 15th to avoid frost.
 
Featured Recipe: French Toast Casserole

Makes a great Mother's Day breakfast or brunch, and it's easy enough that the kids can help make it.

What You'll Need:

  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 12 slices sandwich bread
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 pinch salt

Step by Step:

  • Coat a 9x13-inch baking dish with melted butter.
  • Spread any remaining melted butter over bottom of dish.
  • Sprinkle brown sugar and cinnamon evenly over melted butter.
  • Arrange bread in two layers over brown sugar mixture.
  • Beat eggs, milk, and salt in a bowl; pour over bread.
  • Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Bake in the preheated oven until golden brown, about 30 minutes.
  • Serve warm, with your favorite French toast toppings.
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